Egg donation

The advantages of an in-house ova bank

Oocytes are particularly sensitive to cryopreservation processes since they have a number of characteristics that adversely affect their survival. However, improvements to cryopreservation techniques in ova banks through the use of vitrification have made it possible to achieve survival rates that are comparable to those obtained in fresh cycles.

For a number of reasons, pursuing an efficient […]

2019-04-26T11:59:54+02:0026 de April de 2019|0 Comments

What happens to excess embryos following assisted reproduction treatment?

When in vitro fertilisation treatment commences, one of the aims is to try and achieve an appropriate number of good quality embryos in the laboratory so that the best ones can be selected and transferred. Whilst the Spanish law on assisted reproduction (Law 14/2006) permits transfer of a maximum of 3 embryos per cycle, progress in techniques has meant that […]

2019-03-08T10:01:34+02:008 de March de 2019|0 Comments

What tests do I need to have before egg donation treatment?

Egg donation has become an option for women who, for whatever reason, can no longer use their own ova. For example, due to poor ovarian reserve, poor oocyte quality and premature menopause.

The process is widely used in Spain. As well as exceeding organ
donations and transplants in number, we also have the largest number of egg
donors in Europe.

It […]

2019-02-15T09:45:38+02:0015 de February de 2019|0 Comments

Progress in treatment for patients with poor ovarian response

Personalising courses of treatment is undoubtedly currently the
most important area of change in the field of medicine. A specific strategy should be designed
depending on each patient’s individual characteristics.

One of the key areas for developing personalised medical healthcare is the use of pharmacogenetics. A patient needs different doses or types of pharmaceutical drugs depending on certain genetic variations. […]

2019-01-23T10:37:32+02:0025 de January de 2019|0 Comments

The impact of Turner syndrome on women

Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition caused by partial or total loss of one of the X chromosomes.
All human beings have 23 pairs of chromosomes and this is what is known as the karyotype. It is where all genetic information is stored. In other words, it is what determines our external appearance, our personal physical characteristics, how our organs work, whether or not we will have certain illnesses and so on. There are 22 pairs of numerical chromosomes ranging from 1 to 22 and one pair of sex chromosomes: X and Y. Women have two X chromosomes – one from their father and one from their mother. Men have one X chromosome – from their mother – and one Y chromosome – from their father. If, when a female embryo is generated, incorrect division leading to total or partial loss of the X chromosome takes place, this generates an abnormal karyotype that is characteristic of women with Turner syndrome. The syndrome, by definition, does not occur in males because they only have one X chromosome and cannot live unless this chromosome is present. […]

2018-11-14T11:19:07+02:0016 de November de 2018|1 Comment

Oocyte quality

Oocyte quality is one of the most important of the factors that have an impact on fertility in women. Optimum oocyte quality generally gives rise to embryos with an increased ability to implant in the uterus. […]

2019-06-20T08:31:46+02:0027 de July de 2018|0 Comments

Fragile X chromosome syndrome and fertility

Fragile X syndrome is one of the most common causes of hereditary intellectual disability.
The gene responsible for the disease is known as FMR1 and it is found in the X sex chromosome. As a result, both the transmission and the severity of the disorder varies in each sex. As a general rule, men are said to suffer from it whilst women are said to transmit it.
There is a repeat region in the FMR1 gene (expansion) and its size determines whether or not the individual has the disorder or not, as indicated below. […]

2018-06-26T17:29:28+02:0029 de June de 2018|0 Comments

What became of my embryos? Haven’t I got embryos to freeze?

These are just some of the questions that couples might ask at an important time during their treatment, just before embryo transfer.
In all cases of fertility treatment involving the in vitro fertilisation (IVF) laboratory, it is essential that all couples are given extensive, detailed and personalised information. This means talking about the embryo fertilisation and development processes.
When only a few fertilised oocytes are available as a result of poor ovarian reserve, transfer is carried out on day 2 or 3 of development in around 60% of cases because at this stage we can clearly select the embryos that are suitable for transfer. In around half of these cases it is not possible to cryopreserve embryos for future attempts. […]

2017-12-05T11:22:45+02:007 de December de 2017|0 Comments

If you’re thinking about becoming a mother using donated eggs, here are eight questions and answers for you

As is only to be expected, women have a number of doubts when they first take the important decision to become a mother using an egg donated by another women. The first reaction is one of shock when a woman finds out that she will need to rely on egg donation. Once they have had time to come to terms with the situation, many women take it on board naturally and accept the option that will allow them to give birth to their child. For others, however, the process takes longer and it needs to be thought through before it can be accepted or, in some cases, rejected.
Women go through what is known as genetic mourning during the process when they become aware of the fact that the baby will not have their genes. According to the experts at Instituto Bernabeu, accepting this situation from the outset is the best way forward if patients are to avoid turning the doubts and questions that come up along the way into a concern or even an obsession for the future mother. […]

2019-02-14T15:00:24+02:0013 de October de 2017|0 Comments

Should I tell my children they were born as a result of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or egg donation?

One of the questions that couples frequently ask me in their appointments is if they should tell their child that they were the result of IVF or egg donation? How will the child react when told?
The answer needs to be thought through and only you will find the one that’s right for you. Your personality is based on a number of factors such as principles, education, opinions (prejudices), beliefs and experiences that shape your thoughts and, as such, the way you feel and act. In order to get a clear answer, I suggest you put those opinions aside and take all the time you need. Set your irrational thoughts aside and the answer will come to you. There are couples who do not know what they will do until their child is born. However, once you’ve decided, don’t doubt your choice. Accept the consequences and be consistent. Whatever you decide to do, be sure that it makes you happy because being happy is a decision. […]

2017-07-04T11:56:47+02:004 de August de 2017|2 Comments
Do you need help?