How long should I wait following unsuccessful assisted reproduction treatment?

We are often asked this question at our clinic because, following an unsuccessful attempt at in vitro fertilisation there is always the hope of another go. The recommendation has always traditionally been to leave a space of 3 months between each ovarian stimulation, which can be stressful for patients whose age is against them.
Research has been carried out with the aim of determining whether or not a wait is necessary. The studies compare a wait of one month with a wait of three months and the results obtained are the same.
It is for this reason that we do not recommend putting off a new attempt for more than one month in patients who need to carry out treatment as soon as possible. […]

The importance of the Fallopian tubes in fertility

The Fallopian tubes are two, very thin elongated structures measuring around 12 centimetres in length which connect the peritoneal cavity to the uterus. In this external abdominal part, they are in very close contact with the ovaries.
The Fallopian tubes play a vital role or function in human reproduction: in the first instance, they are responsible for suctioning the egg from the ovary each month and later for waiting 24-72 hours for fertilisation. Should this not happen, the egg is simply absorbed. If it is fertilised, the Fallopian tube allows the fertilised egg to travel to the uterus thanks to contractions and to the hair cells lining it. The fertilised egg (or zygote) remains in the Fallopian tube for around 48-72 hours on its journey to the uterus where it will eventually implant the embryo. […]

Safety in the in vitro fertilisation (IVF) laboratory so that errors are avoided

A recent news item generated alarm regarding safety procedures in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) laboratories. On this occasion, a hospital in Utrecht is currently investigating 26 potential cases of confusion as a result of insemination with semen samples from different patients. We say that making mistakes is only natural, but when we are working with gametes and embryos, the error rate must be zero.
This recent news instils fear in patients since they are not familiar with the safety measures present in IVF laboratories. This fear can generate a lack of confidence in the clinic and its staff.  If we take into account that assisted reproduction treatment generates stress, news of this kind increases fears even more and generates even greater stress. […]

Personalised counselling unit. Don’t let your doubts hold you back. We’re there to make you feel at ease

Behind our on-line consultation system, there is a team of trained personnel. The team is ready to help users and make them see that the concerns amongst people who are looking for an answer to their doubts or worries, are also our concerns. Instituto Bernabeu has a Personalised Counselling Unit. Its team of experts has been trained to clear up the doubts which people understandably have when they are thinking about beginning treatment, when they wish to compare opinions, when they are looking for help regarding how much treatment will cost or when they have gynaecological-related doubts about assisted reproduction.  […]

Will my frozen embryos survive?

Cryopreservation, or embryo freezing, is an essential part of courses of assisted reproduction treatment since it means that embryos can be preserved in order to be used at a later date and without the passing of time having a negative impact on their viability.
Embryos obtained as a result of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) may be thawed for a number of reasons: […]

What is a spermatid?

Spermatozoa production takes place in the testicular seminiferous tubules and the process is known as spermatogenesis.  At the end of this process, a germ cell generates 4 mature spermatozoa which will survive in the human body for between 62 and 75 days.  The final stage in spermatogenesis, known as spermiogenesis, is a cell differentiation and maturation process consisting of the change from spermatids to spermatozoa.  As can be seen in the picture, the spermatids develop from secondary spermatocites and have already undergone Meiosis I and II division. They have a normal set of chromosomes (haploid) which means that fertilisation of a mature egg can take place. Therefore, and despite the fact that they are immature cells, they can be used in assisted reproduction techniques using ICSI when there are no mature sperm in samples taken from the ejaculate or testicles. […]

Asthenozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant?

Asthenozoospermia is a decrease in the percentage of motile sperm in a sperm sample and it is identified by means of a seminogram or semen analysis.
Nowadays, seminograms are a basic tool which provide us with information in order to evaluate a man’s fertility and they are very useful when determining personalised treatment for the couple concerned. The analysis can be used to evaluate numerous factors such as the concentration, motility and morphology of sperm present in the ejaculate, amongst others.
According to the criteria included in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) (2010) manual, a man has asthenozoospermia when less than 32% of sperm in the ejaculate have progressive motility (sperm which move around) or when there it less than 40% total motile sperm (motile sperm which do and do not move around). […]

How are seminograms interpreted?

A seminogram, or semen analysis, is a basic analysis of a semen sample with the aim of determining semen quality. In order to carry out the analysis correctly, the patient needs to refrain from sexual intercourse for a period of 3 to 5 days. That is, he must not ejaculate during that period and the sample must be obtained by means of masturbation.
The most relevant parameters evaluated in a semen sample include: […]

By |2016-12-13T19:08:46+00:0016 de December de 2016|Fertility, News, Reproductive biology, Urology|0 Comments

A negative beta hCG test. Now what?

What happens following the wait (‘the beta hCG wait’) which generates so much anxiety whilst, at the same time, creating the hope that our lives may be changed forever when, in the end, the result is negative?
Many patients say that the absence of symptoms meant that they knew what was coming; others were also expecting the worst because they had begun to bleed prior to getting the result of the analysis.
It’s important to point out that the presence or absence of ‘symptoms’ which women associate with pregnancy are not a means of diagnosis. It’s also important to clarify that vaginal bleeding of varying intensity is not infrequent prior to the programmed pregnancy test date and this does not necessarily mean that the result will be negative. Indeed, the results obtained from an analysis of the pregnancy hormone in blood is the only reliable proof available. A urine analysis is also an option but needs to be carried out a little later on and is not one hundred percent reliable. […]

What is a hydrosalpinx and how will it affect my fertility?

The tubes connecting the ovaries and the uterus are known as the Fallopian tubes (or uterine tubes). These structures play an essential role in natural reproduction and are responsible for receiving the egg each month and, furthermore, it is here that the union between egg and sperm takes place (fertilisation). They also enable the resulting embryo to be transported to the uterus which is where pregnancy will take place.
A hydrosalpinx is the result of an obstruction at the far ends of the Fallopian tubes which leads to the area becoming filled with liquid. This can lead to the Fallopian tubes becoming very swollen and distended, resulting in a ‘sausage-like’ appearance. In many cases, the obstruction and the liquid that has accumulated impair correct functioning of the Fallopian tube: semen does not travel up, the egg is not received by the tube and fertilisation does not take place, making achieving a natural pregnancy complicated (particularly so if both Fallopian tubes are affected). Alternatively, a hydrosalpinx can lead to pregnancy occurring within the tubes themselves (ectopic pregnancy). […]