Does being sexually aroused improve semen quality?

It has been scientifically proven that there are risk factors in our daily lives that have a negative impact on the quantity and quality of spermatozoa. These factors include emotional stress, doing a physically demanding job, sitting for prolonged periods of time, elevated local temperature, having high blood pressure and taking certain drugs over a prolonged period of time.
With this in mind, are there factors in our daily lives that are good for semen quality? […]

2017-07-12T09:28:29+02:0014 de July de 2017|0 Comments

What are an embryo’s nutritional requirements prior to transfer to the mother?

During in vitro fertilisation processes, for the first few days of their lives, human embryos have to develop outside the mother’s body in special incubators.  Temperature and pH conditions need to be optimum and embryos also need to have access to all the necessary ingredients in order to feed and, in doing so, meet their energy requirements. Culture media are used for this. […]

2017-07-05T09:23:38+02:007 de July de 2017|0 Comments

What is a residual follicle? Diagnosis and treatment of a residual cyst

Residual follicle is the term given to the structure remaining in the ovary following a process of stimulation, whether this has been for insemination or during a cycle of in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Diagnosis is generally carried out using ultrasound imaging.
On the whole, before embarking on a course of ovarian stimulation, a basal ultrasound scan is carried out. The aim is to check that the ovary is resting. In other words, that it has antral follicles measuring under 10 millimetres in length. […]

2017-06-23T09:38:42+02:0023 de June de 2017|0 Comments

A less invasive, simpler technique: SOFT IVF or MINI IVF

Having a sufficient number of mature egg cells is one of the key steps to obtaining excellent results in a cycle of in vitro fertilisation (IVF). In order to achieve this, the ovaries need to be stimulated and, contrary to what happens during a natural cycle, the ovaries need to simultaneously mature an appropriate number of eggs.
The most commonly used stimulation protocols are based on the use of doses of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). These may or may not be administered along with other drugs and vary between 150 and 300 IU/day. The response will be somewhere between 7 and 15 follicles. […]

2020-09-25T10:52:05+02:0012 de May de 2017|0 Comments

The adventure of deciding to become a single mother: maternity alone

If becoming a parent is an adventure in itself, taking the step to become a single mother by choice is undoubtedly a challenge. Nowadays, nobody is surprised when a woman decides to have children by herself. It is a decision she takes after having thought long and hard about it. The future mother needs to feel that she is in no way alone during the process. Instituto Bernabeu has been helping women who decide to become single mothers using assisted reproduction treatment for years. The clinic has a team of specialists who, as well as having an in-depth scientific understanding of the situation, bring a very human touch to the sensitive issue of choosing to be a single parent. […]

2017-04-28T13:04:36+02:0028 de April de 2017|0 Comments

The importance of the Fallopian tubes in fertility

The Fallopian tubes are two, very thin elongated structures measuring around 12 centimetres in length which connect the peritoneal cavity to the uterus. In this external abdominal part, they are in very close contact with the ovaries.
The Fallopian tubes play a vital role or function in human reproduction: in the first instance, they are responsible for suctioning the egg from the ovary each month and later for waiting 24-72 hours for fertilisation. Should this not happen, the egg is simply absorbed. If it is fertilised, the Fallopian tube allows the fertilised egg to travel to the uterus thanks to contractions and to the hair cells lining it. The fertilised egg (or zygote) remains in the Fallopian tube for around 48-72 hours on its journey to the uterus where it will eventually implant the embryo. […]

2017-03-30T19:11:01+02:0031 de March de 2017|0 Comments

Safety in the in vitro fertilisation (IVF) laboratory so that errors are avoided

A recent news item generated alarm regarding safety procedures in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) laboratories. On this occasion, a hospital in Utrecht is currently investigating 26 potential cases of confusion as a result of insemination with semen samples from different patients. We say that making mistakes is only natural, but when we are working with gametes and embryos, the error rate must be zero.
This recent news instils fear in patients since they are not familiar with the safety measures present in IVF laboratories. This fear can generate a lack of confidence in the clinic and its staff.  If we take into account that assisted reproduction treatment generates stress, news of this kind increases fears even more and generates even greater stress. […]

2017-03-02T14:30:18+02:003 de March de 2017|0 Comments

What is a spermatid?

Spermatozoa production takes place in the testicular seminiferous tubules and the process is known as spermatogenesis.  At the end of this process, a germ cell generates 4 mature spermatozoa which will survive in the human body for between 62 and 75 days.  The final stage in spermatogenesis, known as spermiogenesis, is a cell differentiation and maturation process consisting of the change from spermatids to spermatozoa.  As can be seen in the picture, the spermatids develop from secondary spermatocites and have already undergone Meiosis I and II division. They have a normal set of chromosomes (haploid) which means that fertilisation of a mature egg can take place. Therefore, and despite the fact that they are immature cells, they can be used in assisted reproduction techniques using ICSI when there are no mature sperm in samples taken from the ejaculate or testicles. […]

2017-01-13T14:38:30+02:0013 de January de 2017|0 Comments

Asthenozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant?

Asthenozoospermia is a decrease in the percentage of motile sperm in a sperm sample and it is identified by means of a seminogram or semen analysis.
Nowadays, seminograms are a basic tool which provide us with information in order to evaluate a man’s fertility and they are very useful when determining personalised treatment for the couple concerned. The analysis can be used to evaluate numerous factors such as the concentration, motility and morphology of sperm present in the ejaculate, amongst others.
According to the criteria included in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) (2010) manual, a man has asthenozoospermia when less than 32% of sperm in the ejaculate have progressive motility (sperm which move around) or when there it less than 40% total motile sperm (motile sperm which do and do not move around). […]

2019-06-20T08:32:21+02:0030 de December de 2016|0 Comments

Oligozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant? What about criptozoospermia?

Oligozoospermia is the presence of an abnormally low number of sperm in a semen sample.
According to the criteria in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) manual, normal sperm content in a sample of semen should be equal to or above 15 million per millimetre. If a sperm count gives a result below this figure, this is known as oligozoospermia and it may be associated with fertility issues. More than one sample will need to be evaluated in order to confirm this.
The diagnosis method consists of a spermogram which, amongst other things, gives a sperm count per millimetre of semen. […]

2019-06-20T08:32:42+02:004 de November de 2016|0 Comments
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