X chromosome

The impact of Turner syndrome on women

Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition caused by partial or total loss of one of the X chromosomes.
All human beings have 23 pairs of chromosomes and this is what is known as the karyotype. It is where all genetic information is stored. In other words, it is what determines our external appearance, our personal physical characteristics, how our organs work, whether or not we will have certain illnesses and so on. There are 22 pairs of numerical chromosomes ranging from 1 to 22 and one pair of sex chromosomes: X and Y. Women have two X chromosomes – one from their father and one from their mother. Men have one X chromosome – from their mother – and one Y chromosome – from their father. If, when a female embryo is generated, incorrect division leading to total or partial loss of the X chromosome takes place, this generates an abnormal karyotype that is characteristic of women with Turner syndrome. The syndrome, by definition, does not occur in males because they only have one X chromosome and cannot live unless this chromosome is present. […]

2018-11-14T11:19:07+02:0016 de November de 2018|1 Comment

Can a patient know and choose their future child’s gender before embryo transfer?

It is possible to determine the gender of a future baby (embryo) before transfer takes place. In fact, this strategy has been used for many years in order to avoid the transmission of sex chromosome hereditary diseases (pre-implantation genetic diagnosis or PGD).
When the technique was in its early days, embryo analysis was carried out on day 3 of embryo development. Nowadays, it is carried out between days 5 and 7 of development (blastocyst stage). The analysis provides a simultaneous understanding of all the chromosomes in the embryo, meaning that transmission of chromosomal abnormalities can be completely eliminated. The technique has a 98% success rate. […]

2018-01-03T10:07:02+02:005 de January de 2018|0 Comments

A boy or a girl: can I choose my baby’s gender?

Whilst it is technically possible to choose a child’s gender using pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, Spanish law prohibits selecting a baby’s sex, except with a view to avoiding the transmission of genetic diseases associated with the X chromosome. Such is the case, for example, of haemophilia A.
Law 14/2006 indicates that pre-implantation genetic diagnosis may only be used in order to detect serious genetic diseases or those which compromise the viability of an embryo. Therefore, this technique may not be used in order to select a future baby’s gender. Any other use of this technique is a serious offence which is punishable by law. […]

2018-06-21T13:08:10+02:0016 de September de 2016|0 Comments
Do you need help?