Oligozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant? What about criptozoospermia?

Oligozoospermia is the presence of an abnormally low number of sperm in a semen sample.
According to the criteria in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) manual, normal sperm content in a sample of semen should be equal to or above 15 million per millimetre. If a sperm count gives a result below this figure, this is known as oligozoospermia and it may be associated with fertility issues. More than one sample will need to be evaluated in order to confirm this.
The diagnosis method consists of a spermogram which, amongst other things, gives a sperm count per millimetre of semen. […]

2019-06-20T08:32:42+02:004 de November de 2016|0 Comments

Male fertility tests

When a couple is faced with difficulties getting pregnant, there is approximately a 50% chance of the reason for this being a factor in the male partner.
The main cause of fertility issues in men is poor semen quality. Therefore, various parameters in semen need to be analysed in order to determine what the quality of the semen is. Two parameters are particularly important: the concentration or quantity of sperm in semen and their motility. This needs to be adequate in order to ensure that the egg is fertilised.
There are several quick tests available on the market. They are similar to female ovulation tests and they are understood to carefully evaluate semen quality and determine if a man is fertile or not. But are these tests really useful in understanding semen quality? […]

2016-10-20T18:04:30+02:0021 de October de 2016|0 Comments

The male factor in infertility

In contrast with the old-fashioned belief that reproduction issues are a female thing, current figures are clear: 47% of infertility cases in a couple are down to an issue with the man. Therefore, when a couple has infertility issues and they seek the help of a clinic specialising in assisted reproduction, the tests and analyses are carried out on both members of the couple. This practice of looking into both the female factor and the male factor is now common and carried out by all experts in the field, but there is still a lack of understanding of the fertility issues which men can have. What are they? What solutions do leading assisted reproduction clinics offer nowadays?
The most common issues amongst men are “changes in the sperm count with no apparent cause”, explains Instituto Bernabeu in Alicante. That is, a low number of sperm, poor sperm mobility or abnormal morphology. Additionally, there may be more concrete and identifiable reasons for changes in sperm such as obstruction issues, infection, diseases or genetic reasons which impede egg fertilisation or which affect embryo quality. […]

2016-08-04T13:30:33+02:003 de December de 2015|0 Comments

Blocked fallopian tube. The involvement of “tubal factor” in fertility

The Fallopian tubes are trumpet-shaped structures that begin in the uterine cavity and end up opening by the ovaries. After ovulation, the fallopian tubes collect the released egg that is fertilized on the first portion, which is the closest part to the ovary. For this, the spermatozoa travel through the vagina, the cervix, the uterine cavity, and finally the route to the end of the tube. After fertilization occurs, the embryo (fertilized egg) launches its first divisions and travels through the fallopian tube towards the uterus where implantation occur and thus the establishment of pregnancy. […]

2016-09-22T11:41:26+02:005 de May de 2014|0 Comments
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