semen

Can patients manage embryo and gamete transportation?

Whilst it is not part of the day-to-day routine at reproductive
medicine clinics, it is now increasingly common to have to transport biological
samples (oocytes, semen or embryos) from one clinic to another and even from
one country to another.

There can be several reasons for this such as the following:

– The
couple wishes to continue their treatment in a […]

2019-02-08T10:17:41+02:008 de February de 2019|0 Comments

Seminal lavage: what is it and what is it used for?

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C (HCV) and hepatitis B (HBV) are viruses that are transmitted through blood and body fluids as well as through vertical transmission (from the mother to the foetus).  As a result, couples wishing to get pregnant in which one partner is a carrier of a virus are faced with the question of whether or not it is possible to do so without the other partner getting infected. If the male partner has one of these viruses and his female partner does not (serodiscordant couples), assisted reproduction technology (ART) can be used in order to avoid transmission. […]

2018-10-03T09:50:57+02:005 de October de 2018|0 Comments

The role of seminal fluid in improving fertility treatment

There are two parts to semen: spermatozoa and the seminal fluid that the spermatozoa use as their means of travel.
Seminal fluid has traditionally been attributed the role of a simple means of transportation. However, many years ago, it started to become clear that exposure to seminal fluid with no spermatozoa content improved in vitro fertilisation results and the results in couples experiencing recurrent pregnancy loss.
Increased proof of this improvement in results has emerged over the last few months, as indicated in the recent scientific publications referenced at the end of this post. These pieces of scientific work confirm early observations and explain the reasons why. […]

2017-12-20T10:23:13+02:0022 de December de 2017|0 Comments

What are the main causes of male sterility and infertility?

The male partner’s role in infertility has, historically, been undervalued and underdiagnosed for cultural and social reasons. However, we are now seeing progress in the analysis of men and a growing interest amongst patients in their fertility issue. Consultations for men with difficulties having children are increasingly common.
The causes of male sterility (male factor) have seen a significant increase over the last few years and are now responsible for up to 50% of cases of sterility in couples. Up to 30% of cases of infertility are due to the male factor alone and in a further 20% of cases there is a combination of both male and female factors. This is why urological examination of the male partner is so important during the couple’s fertility analysis. […]

2018-09-10T18:35:22+02:0016 de June de 2017|0 Comments

Oligozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant? What about criptozoospermia?

Oligozoospermia is the presence of an abnormally low number of sperm in a semen sample.
According to the criteria in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) manual, normal sperm content in a sample of semen should be equal to or above 15 million per millimetre. If a sperm count gives a result below this figure, this is known as oligozoospermia and it may be associated with fertility issues. More than one sample will need to be evaluated in order to confirm this.
The diagnosis method consists of a spermogram which, amongst other things, gives a sperm count per millimetre of semen. […]

2016-11-03T13:48:55+02:004 de November de 2016|0 Comments

Techniques for obtaining spermatozoa

There are currently many different solutions when spermatozoa are not present in ejaculate. Access to a trained urologist increases chances of achieving spermatozoa in greater quantities and with improved quality.
What is TESA (Testicular Sperm Aspiration)?
This is a question which many couples ask themselves as they turn to assisted reproduction treatment when the issue is an absence of spermatozoa in semen (azoospermia) with the aim of obtaining sperm. TESA (Testicular Sperm Aspiration) is a technique used for obtaining spermatozoa by testicular puncture.
Modern-day urology means that spermatozoa can be obtained for use in assisted reproduction techniques using different means. Over the last 10 years, we have improved the chances of achieving good results whilst reducing the invasive nature of the process and improving the quality of samples obtained in cases in which this was not previously possible. Men who have undergone a vasectomy, cases in which the sperm duct is obstructed or patients with cystic fibrosis are common examples in which adequate spermatozoa may be obtained through a simple testicular puncture under local anaesthetic. Different types of biopsy are also prescribed in certain cases. The differences between them are as follows: […]

2016-08-26T10:15:48+02:0026 de August de 2016|0 Comments

Differences between Artificial Insemination and In Vitro Fertilisation

Artificial insemination is a simple technique carried out on couples with specific fertility problems.

The ideal candidate would be a young woman with permeable fallopian tubes, less than 3 years of sterility and a male partner with normal semen. Artificial insemination is useful for couples that meet these requirements. No more than 4 tries are carried out, and the overall pregnancy rates are 25% – 30 %.

[…]

2016-08-09T13:46:05+02:0014 de December de 2011|1 Comment

Spermiogramme and Advanced Semen Studies (FISH AND TUNEL)

A seminogramme or spermiogramme is one of the basic studies performed on men to determine the sperm quality. Sperm is analysed from both a macroscopic and microscopic viewpoint. The most relevant parameters of the study are threefold:
–          Sperm count
–          Sperm motility
–          Sperm morphology
[…]

2016-09-22T12:29:19+02:0026 de April de 2011|4 Comments
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