ovaries

What is a hydrosalpinx and how will it affect my fertility?

The tubes connecting the ovaries and the uterus are known as the Fallopian tubes (or uterine tubes). These structures play an essential role in natural reproduction and are responsible for receiving the egg each month and, furthermore, it is here that the union between egg and sperm takes place (fertilisation). They also enable the resulting embryo to be transported to the uterus which is where pregnancy will take place.
A hydrosalpinx is the result of an obstruction at the far ends of the Fallopian tubes which leads to the area becoming filled with liquid. This can lead to the Fallopian tubes becoming very swollen and distended, resulting in a ‘sausage-like’ appearance. In many cases, the obstruction and the liquid that has accumulated impair correct functioning of the Fallopian tube: semen does not travel up, the egg is not received by the tube and fertilisation does not take place, making achieving a natural pregnancy complicated (particularly so if both Fallopian tubes are affected). Alternatively, a hydrosalpinx can lead to pregnancy occurring within the tubes themselves (ectopic pregnancy). […]

2016-12-01T11:45:42+02:002 de December de 2016|0 Comments

Instituto Bernabeu discovers fertility genetic variants

Following years of research, the Poor Responder Unit at Instituto Bernabeu has, for the first time, discovered the genes that play a role in ovarian reserve. This makes choosing the most appropriate medication for the patient’s genetic make-up possible, thus optimising ovarian response.

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2016-10-13T10:19:12+02:0014 de October de 2016|0 Comments

What is the Ovarian Reserve? How important is it for fertility?

More and more women ask us every day about the importance of their age and if they should become pregnant sooner rather than later.
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2018-02-02T09:59:39+02:0021 de November de 2011|0 Comments
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