oligozoospermia

What are the main causes of male sterility and infertility?

The male partner’s role in infertility has, historically, been undervalued and underdiagnosed for cultural and social reasons. However, we are now seeing progress in the analysis of men and a growing interest amongst patients in their fertility issue. Consultations for men with difficulties having children are increasingly common.
The causes of male sterility (male factor) have seen a significant increase over the last few years and are now responsible for up to 50% of cases of sterility in couples. Up to 30% of cases of infertility are due to the male factor alone and in a further 20% of cases there is a combination of both male and female factors. This is why urological examination of the male partner is so important during the couple’s fertility analysis. […]

2018-09-10T18:35:22+02:0016 de June de 2017|1 Comment

How are seminograms interpreted?

A seminogram, or semen analysis, is a basic analysis of a semen sample with the aim of determining semen quality. In order to carry out the analysis correctly, the patient needs to refrain from sexual intercourse for a period of 3 to 5 days. That is, he must not ejaculate during that period and the sample must be obtained by means of masturbation.
The most relevant parameters evaluated in a semen sample include: […]

2016-12-13T19:08:46+02:0016 de December de 2016|0 Comments

Oligozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant? What about criptozoospermia?

Oligozoospermia is the presence of an abnormally low number of sperm in a semen sample.
According to the criteria in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) manual, normal sperm content in a sample of semen should be equal to or above 15 million per millimetre. If a sperm count gives a result below this figure, this is known as oligozoospermia and it may be associated with fertility issues. More than one sample will need to be evaluated in order to confirm this.
The diagnosis method consists of a spermogram which, amongst other things, gives a sperm count per millimetre of semen. […]

2019-06-20T08:32:42+02:004 de November de 2016|0 Comments

Male fertility tests

When a couple is faced with difficulties getting pregnant, there is approximately a 50% chance of the reason for this being a factor in the male partner.
The main cause of fertility issues in men is poor semen quality. Therefore, various parameters in semen need to be analysed in order to determine what the quality of the semen is. Two parameters are particularly important: the concentration or quantity of sperm in semen and their motility. This needs to be adequate in order to ensure that the egg is fertilised.
There are several quick tests available on the market. They are similar to female ovulation tests and they are understood to carefully evaluate semen quality and determine if a man is fertile or not. But are these tests really useful in understanding semen quality? […]

2016-10-20T18:04:30+02:0021 de October de 2016|0 Comments

New diagnosis technique for male sterility and missing genetic material (Y chromosome microdeletions).

We all have 46 chromosomes: 23 of them are inherited from our father and 23 are from our mother. The genetic information for our entire body is stored within these chromosomes. Two of the 46 are sex chromosomes and determine whether we are male (XY) or female (XX). Therefore, the Y chromosome contains all the necessary information for differentiating males from females as well as for sperm production.
The study of Y chromosome microdeletions consists of checking if chromosome Y is complete and, as such, has all the necessary information for satisfactory sperm production or if, on the contrary, small fragments are missing. The loss of such fragments leads to altered spermiogramme which can mean poor sperm production (oligozoospermia) or even no production at all (azoospermia). […]

2017-08-28T13:31:45+02:0023 de September de 2015|0 Comments

Semen quality parameters according to the World Health Organisation (WHO)

The spermiogram is a basic tool that provides us with some of the best information to assess male fertility. It is also very useful in order to formulate a personalized treatment plan for the couple.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) has published several editions of the “Manual for the Examination of Human Semen and Sperm-Cervical Mucus Interaction”, the last one in 2010. Those manuals help and guide andrology laboratories to determine sperm quality. Moreover, in recent years, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embriology (ESHRE) in collaboration with the WHO have developed a program to improve standardization between laboratories in terms of sperm sample diagnosis and assessment criteria. […]

2019-06-20T08:33:11+02:0017 de February de 2014|0 Comments
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