menstruation

How long should I wait following unsuccessful assisted reproduction treatment?

We are often asked this question at our clinic because, following an unsuccessful attempt at in vitro fertilisation there is always the hope of another go. The recommendation has always traditionally been to leave a space of 3 months between each ovarian stimulation, which can be stressful for patients whose age is against them.
Research has been carried out with the aim of determining whether or not a wait is necessary. The studies compare a wait of one month with a wait of three months and the results obtained are the same.
It is for this reason that we do not recommend putting off a new attempt for more than one month in patients who need to carry out treatment as soon as possible. […]

2017-05-04T09:05:59+02:006 de April de 2017|0 Comments

Ovarian stimulation: What is it? Are there any risks involved?

During the first few days of a period, a complex process takes place in the ovaries. The first step is to gather and initiate development in several follicles that contain eggs. Following this, only one egg is selected and it then develops. A mature egg is released during ovulation.
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2016-05-26T17:43:17+02:0027 de May de 2016|0 Comments

Calculating ovulation: the best time to get pregnant

One of the most frequently asked questions among couples is how to calculate the most fertile days of the cycle and when ovulation will take place in order to make this coincide with sexual intercourse. Calculating it is simple in the case of regular, 28-day cycles. […]

2016-08-04T13:08:32+02:0022 de April de 2016|0 Comments

Adenomyosis and recurrent implantation failure

Adenomyosis occurs when the tissue that lines the inner part of the uterus (the endometrium) is found in the outermost part of the uterus (myometrium), which is a muscle layer. It is sometimes referred to as endometriosis of the uterus, given that endometrial tissue is found where it should not be, just like it happens in endometriosis. […]

2018-09-17T09:21:43+02:0021 de October de 2015|0 Comments

Anembryonic gestation

The anembryonic pregnancy or “blighted ovum” is a specific type of miscarriage in which the fertilized egg implants in the uterus but the embryo does not develop. It is a relatively common problem: 10-15% of clinically detected pregnancies are lost spontaneously and one third of them are blighted ovum.
After fertilization, that is, after the union of sperm and egg, begin a series of cell divisions that lead to the formation of the gestational sac  surrounded by a “shell” or cover called trophoblast (which is the one that will lead to future placenta); inside the gestational sac the embryo will develop. In the case of anembryonic pregnancy the gestational sac is formed with the trophoblastic cover but the embryo is not displayed because it has stopped developing at a very early stage, before reaching a millimeter in size, so it cannot be detected with an ultrasound. […]

2014-05-15T10:04:18+02:0015 de May de 2014|0 Comments

Endometrial polyps, what are they and how are they formed?

Endometrial polyps are protrusions or growths in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. Contain abundant inside your blood vessels and endometrial glands that respond to hormonal stimuli.
Polyps proliferate to form a region of the basal layer of the endometrium, and are less responsiveness to hormonal changes. Taking place repetition of menses, the endometrium functional layer surrounding the polyp breaks off and becomes increasingly individual from a pedicle. […]

2016-09-22T11:50:37+02:005 de February de 2014|0 Comments

What is the Ovarian Reserve? How important is it for fertility?

More and more women ask us every day about the importance of their age and if they should become pregnant sooner rather than later.
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2018-02-02T09:59:39+02:0021 de November de 2011|0 Comments
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