laparoscopy

What is a hydrosalpinx and how will it affect my fertility?

The tubes connecting the ovaries and the uterus are known as the Fallopian tubes (or uterine tubes). These structures play an essential role in natural reproduction and are responsible for receiving the egg each month and, furthermore, it is here that the union between egg and sperm takes place (fertilisation). They also enable the resulting embryo to be transported to the uterus which is where pregnancy will take place.
A hydrosalpinx is the result of an obstruction at the far ends of the Fallopian tubes which leads to the area becoming filled with liquid. This can lead to the Fallopian tubes becoming very swollen and distended, resulting in a ‘sausage-like’ appearance. In many cases, the obstruction and the liquid that has accumulated impair correct functioning of the Fallopian tube: semen does not travel up, the egg is not received by the tube and fertilisation does not take place, making achieving a natural pregnancy complicated (particularly so if both Fallopian tubes are affected). Alternatively, a hydrosalpinx can lead to pregnancy occurring within the tubes themselves (ectopic pregnancy). […]

2016-12-01T11:45:42+02:002 de December de 2016|0 Comments

Ovarian cysts: What are they? What are the symptoms? How can they be spotted? How should they be treated?

One of the most common findings during a gynaecological check-up  is the presence of ovarian cysts. This emergence of cysts is often unexpected and is generally a great cause for concern. Such concern is usually down to not knowing whether or not they are benign and whether or no they will require surgery.
Ovarian cysts are nothing more than liquid-filled lumps on the ovaries. This liquid may be fluid or dense and in most cases they are benign and functional cysts.
The term ‘functional’ refers to the fact that they are brought on by the hormonal changes that take place during the menstrual cycle itself and, therefore, tend to be more common during a woman’s childbearing years and less common during the menopause. Sometimes, a follicle which is due to rupture and release an egg during ovulation does not do so and so the liquid remains inside and continues to build up. Therefore, the cyst increases in size. These are what are known as follicular cysts and they generally disappear after a few months without the need for any type of treatment because they end up dissolving or bursting of their own accord. […]

2016-08-08T18:10:12+02:0012 de August de 2016|0 Comments

Blocked fallopian tube. The involvement of “tubal factor” in fertility

The Fallopian tubes are trumpet-shaped structures that begin in the uterine cavity and end up opening by the ovaries. After ovulation, the fallopian tubes collect the released egg that is fertilized on the first portion, which is the closest part to the ovary. For this, the spermatozoa travel through the vagina, the cervix, the uterine cavity, and finally the route to the end of the tube. After fertilization occurs, the embryo (fertilized egg) launches its first divisions and travels through the fallopian tube towards the uterus where implantation occur and thus the establishment of pregnancy. […]

2016-09-22T11:41:26+02:005 de May de 2014|0 Comments

Endoscopic surgery in fertility treatments

Endoscopic surgery is by definition performed by accessing the site of intervention, either an organ or cavity, through natural or artificial orifices by using an optical system with camera and light that allows us to see what is going to be performed on a television monitor. Surgical manipulation is also done in these orifices or “ports” of entry. […]

2016-09-22T11:45:14+02:0029 de July de 2013|0 Comments
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