fallopian tubes

What is a hysterosalpingography?

A hysterosalpingography is an examination using x-rays and, as its name suggests, it is used for exploring the uterus (hystero-) and fallopian tubes (salpingo-).
The examination is rather uncomfortable but this is remedied by giving the patient some form of pain relief or muscle relaxant before proceeding. An alternative test called a hysterosonography does now exist, too. It is pain free, does not require the use of x-rays and, furthermore, obtains the same results as a hysterosalpingography. Nowadays, hysterosonographies are the preferred choice over hysterosalpingographies. This technique can be performed at Instituto Bernabeu and the results are provided immediately. […]

2018-09-28T09:08:28+02:0028 de September de 2018|0 Comments

Is ovary size important?

As is the case with all the organs in our bodies, over our lifetime, ovaries go through changes that affect not only their size but also how they perform. The ovaries are situated between the uterus and the fallopian tubes. They are essential to reproduction and, therefore, to the survival of the human race.
The ovaries begin to develop when female embryos are around 8 weeks old and during pregnancy they undergo a number of changes that prepare them for their role in reproduction when a woman is in her childbearing years. […]

2017-12-14T13:19:18+02:008 de September de 2017|0 Comments

The importance of the Fallopian tubes in fertility

The Fallopian tubes are two, very thin elongated structures measuring around 12 centimetres in length which connect the peritoneal cavity to the uterus. In this external abdominal part, they are in very close contact with the ovaries.
The Fallopian tubes play a vital role or function in human reproduction: in the first instance, they are responsible for suctioning the egg from the ovary each month and later for waiting 24-72 hours for fertilisation. Should this not happen, the egg is simply absorbed. If it is fertilised, the Fallopian tube allows the fertilised egg to travel to the uterus thanks to contractions and to the hair cells lining it. The fertilised egg (or zygote) remains in the Fallopian tube for around 48-72 hours on its journey to the uterus where it will eventually implant the embryo. […]

2017-03-30T19:11:01+02:0031 de March de 2017|0 Comments

What is a hydrosalpinx and how will it affect my fertility?

The tubes connecting the ovaries and the uterus are known as the Fallopian tubes (or uterine tubes). These structures play an essential role in natural reproduction and are responsible for receiving the egg each month and, furthermore, it is here that the union between egg and sperm takes place (fertilisation). They also enable the resulting embryo to be transported to the uterus which is where pregnancy will take place.
A hydrosalpinx is the result of an obstruction at the far ends of the Fallopian tubes which leads to the area becoming filled with liquid. This can lead to the Fallopian tubes becoming very swollen and distended, resulting in a ‘sausage-like’ appearance. In many cases, the obstruction and the liquid that has accumulated impair correct functioning of the Fallopian tube: semen does not travel up, the egg is not received by the tube and fertilisation does not take place, making achieving a natural pregnancy complicated (particularly so if both Fallopian tubes are affected). Alternatively, a hydrosalpinx can lead to pregnancy occurring within the tubes themselves (ectopic pregnancy). […]

2016-12-01T11:45:42+02:002 de December de 2016|0 Comments

Embryo implantation, the ultimate test

It’s the miracle of life: fertilization and human reproduction. A meticulous and perfect process that allows two cells to come together and create another that will develop until transforming into a new being. […]

2016-10-13T12:28:27+02:0029 de May de 2015|0 Comments

Blocked fallopian tube. The involvement of “tubal factor” in fertility

The Fallopian tubes are trumpet-shaped structures that begin in the uterine cavity and end up opening by the ovaries. After ovulation, the fallopian tubes collect the released egg that is fertilized on the first portion, which is the closest part to the ovary. For this, the spermatozoa travel through the vagina, the cervix, the uterine cavity, and finally the route to the end of the tube. After fertilization occurs, the embryo (fertilized egg) launches its first divisions and travels through the fallopian tube towards the uterus where implantation occur and thus the establishment of pregnancy. […]

2016-09-22T11:41:26+02:005 de May de 2014|0 Comments
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