chromosomal abnormalities

What are the causes of recurrent pregnancy loss?

Spontaneous abortion is defined as an unexpected pregnancy loss before the foetus is viable. In other words, before week 22 of pregnancy and under 500g in weight. The frequency rate of spontaneous abortion is estimated to be between 15 and 20% amongst the general population and it is the most common of all complications during pregnancy.
A small percentage (between 2 and 5%) of cases are recurrent and this is what is known as recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). […]

2018-09-11T17:49:04+02:0014 de September de 2018|0 Comments

The advantages and disadvantages of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)

Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) consists of studying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic abnormalities in the embryo prior to transfer to the mother. Its purpose is to ensure that children are healthy and put an end to the transmission of a specific condition.
There are two types of PGD: the PGD aimed at selecting embryos that are free of a genetic disorder affecting a single gene (PGD) and the PGD that analyses genetic diseases affecting one or more chromosomes (PGS/PGT-A/CCS or PGS). Their names are sometimes a cause for confusion. The post entitled Are PGD, PGS and CCS all one and the same? clarifies the differences between them. […]

2018-03-28T10:52:16+02:0019 de May de 2017|0 Comments

Recurrent pregnancy loss: an issue that does have a solution

Clearly one of the most difficult situations a couple trying for children may have to face is pregnancy loss. Suffering is even greater when, prior to this, the couple has gone through fertility treatment such as in vitro fertilisation, insemination or egg donation.
Pregnancy loss is not always the result of an illness or underlying abnormality. It can be the response nature provides in order to block the development of an abnormal embryo. In fact, when the tissue from the pregnancy loss is examined, a large number of chromosomal abnormalities can be detected. […]

2016-10-13T12:23:48+02:008 de April de 2016|0 Comments

Motherhood at the age of 40

Trying for a child after 40 years of age is a growing trend in today’s society and not only in Spain, but in Europe, too. Professional, personal and social reasons have joined together in making women decide to put motherhood off for longer and longer. But nature takes its course and each woman is only fertile for a certain period of time and this can affect her chances of getting pregnant. In the light of such a common situation, what do we need to take into account? What is the key role played by experts in health and fertility?
Since 2002, the average age at which a woman has her first child has increased two years. Whilst in 2002 the average age was 29, the Spanish National Statistics Institute’s most recent figures show that it has now gone up to 31 and that there is an upward trend.  This increase in the age at which women have their first child is similar to the increase in other European Union countries where an increase of around two years has been registered. Figures show that women are waiting until they are near their 40s and even older before trying to get pregnant. […]

2016-08-04T13:13:05+02:0031 de March de 2016|0 Comments

Usefulness of Comprehensive Chromosomal Screening (PGS/PGT-A/CCS) in Recurrent Miscarriages

When couples make the decision to have a baby, either by natural means or by resorting to assisted reproduction techniques (ART), one of their main concerns is having a full-term pregnancy and a healthy baby. Miscarriage occurs in about 10-15% of pregnancies and is regarded as a “Recurrent miscarriage” when two or more pregnancies are lost spontaneously.
The cause of “Recurrent miscarriages” may be immunological, hormonal or uterine. Yet, the most common cause is no doubt chromosomal, since it is present in more than 50% of cases. […]

2018-05-09T12:19:54+02:0011 de December de 2015|0 Comments

Anembryonic gestation

The anembryonic pregnancy or “blighted ovum” is a specific type of miscarriage in which the fertilized egg implants in the uterus but the embryo does not develop. It is a relatively common problem: 10-15% of clinically detected pregnancies are lost spontaneously and one third of them are blighted ovum.
After fertilization, that is, after the union of sperm and egg, begin a series of cell divisions that lead to the formation of the gestational sac  surrounded by a “shell” or cover called trophoblast (which is the one that will lead to future placenta); inside the gestational sac the embryo will develop. In the case of anembryonic pregnancy the gestational sac is formed with the trophoblastic cover but the embryo is not displayed because it has stopped developing at a very early stage, before reaching a millimeter in size, so it cannot be detected with an ultrasound. […]

2014-05-15T10:04:18+02:0015 de May de 2014|0 Comments

Chromosomal alterations in repeated miscarriages

Couples who get pregnant, either naturally or through assisted reproductive techniques, are especially worried about the successful outcome of the pregnancy.

Unfortunately, some pregnancies end in miscarriage or fetal loss in the week 20 of pregnancy, when the fetus is not able to survive outside of the maternal uterus. […]

2016-09-22T12:23:08+02:0018 de February de 2013|0 Comments

Indications of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD)

Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is a new technique used in Reproductive Medicine and is one of the main sources of innovation and research. PGD allows embryos to be selected from assisted reproduction cycles and tested for certain genetic or chromosomal abnormalitybefore being transferred to the womb.

[…]

2016-08-09T13:27:22+02:006 de September de 2012|2 Comments
Do you need help?