How long should I wait to schedule a fertility appointment?

Couples who are seeking pregnancy and have not managed to succeed for some time must surely have asked themselves this question.
These days, reproductive problems are more common than we may think. Consulting for them should not cause any fear, embarrassment or stress. Furthermore, in many cases the first consultation will help to correct minor abnormalities and facilitate pregnancy in a short period of time and in the simplest way conceivable.
Whatever the case, the advisory guidelines below are offered to help the process of deciding when to schedule an appointment with a specialist in Reproductive Medicine:

Age: The relationship of fertility with age has been made abundantly clear. As a consequence, the older the age, the shorter we should wait to schedule a fertility appointment. For example, from age 37, seeking pregnancy for just a few months would be enough to perform an initial assessment. In general, women who are younger than 30 may wait about a year for pregnancy to occur spontaneously.


Fertility research: one of a kind treatment for one of a kind patients

Research in the field of assisted reproduction provides us with more and more answers to situations which previously had none. It gives us solutions, options and new ways of overcoming the many difficulties which arise in reproduction.  What’s more, progress in science also helps diagnosis and treatment to be increasingly specific, personalised and individual. In fact, we might even say that the aim is to reach a point where one of a kind treatments are designed for one of a kind patients. […]

Ethics and good practice: Let the truth be told

Assisted Human Reproduction is undoubtedly an area with ethical and moral implications. There are common issues that arise with the generation of new embryos when a couple undergoes ART and with transfers of previously frozen embryos. Some of the most frequent issues are: embryo manipulation and genetic diagnosis; the use of donor gametes and the possible coexistence of their legal children with the biological ones in the future; the option of discarding embryos by parents for no other purpose when they don’t wish to donate them to other couples with reproductive problems or for research purposes; the age of women accessing ART, along with a long list of legal, ethical and moral issues pertinent to each assisted reproduction centre. […]

A more reliable technique for detecting anti-Mullerian hormone and estimate ovarian reserve

We have built a new much more reliable, rapid technique (in 3 days the result is obtained) and as we do it directly in our laboratories the price is reduced to 50€. Only requires a blood test that can be performed in our clinics or send the sample by courier.
The determination of AMH levels in the woman’s blood helps us to assess the ovarian reserve and, together with the completion of an ultrasound to count antral follicles, provides information about their reproductive future and if there is or not a need to rush in getting pregnant.
It is also useful for individualizing the treatment for your fertility problem and helps predict the success of it.

By |20 de October de 2014|Fertility, Gynaecology, News, Pregnancy, Women’s health|0 Comments

Anembryonic gestation

The anembryonic pregnancy or “blighted ovum” is a specific type of miscarriage in which the fertilized egg implants in the uterus but the embryo does not develop. It is a relatively common problem: 10-15% of clinically detected pregnancies are lost spontaneously and one third of them are blighted ovum.
After fertilization, that is, after the union of sperm and egg, begin a series of cell divisions that lead to the formation of the gestational sac  surrounded by a “shell” or cover called trophoblast (which is the one that will lead to future placenta); inside the gestational sac the embryo will develop. In the case of anembryonic pregnancy the gestational sac is formed with the trophoblastic cover but the embryo is not displayed because it has stopped developing at a very early stage, before reaching a millimeter in size, so it cannot be detected with an ultrasound. […]

By |15 de May de 2014|Gynaecology, News, Pregnancy, Women’s health|0 Comments

How many eggs on average are donated on an Egg Donation treatment at Instituto Bernabeu?

In Spain, we performed 40% of all egg donation cycles in Europe. The experience accumulated at Instituto Bernabeu for over 15 years, allows us to offer to our patients a high quality and personalized treatment.
When a patient decides to go for an Egg Donation treatment, a chain work is set in the organization, in which we guarantee a commitment of trust, reliability and professional quality.
Why an “x” number of eggs are donated? Why not only one?

Contamination, environmental toxins and fertility

Scientific evidence from the last 15 years shows that without a doubt, environmental toxins before conception and during pregnancy cause long-lasting effects on reproductive health. An example of this is the exposure to mercury, which causes cognitive impairment in children. Another example is the exposure to agricultural pesticides, which is associated with sperm quality alterations and higher incidence of testicular and prostate cancer for men, and in women it interferes with the development of puberty, ovulation, fertility and menopause. […]

Heparin as a Treatment for Repeat Miscarriages or Implantation Failure

Suffering from repeat miscarriages is one of the most painful situations for women trying to have children. This is especially true when these women achieve a pregnancy after using assisted reproduction treatments. […]

Egg donation explained simply

For 21 years, egg donation has been a treatment that Instituto Bernabeu offers to women who need it, which has made it a European reference point for egg donation.

It is the reproductive technique with the highest pregnancy rates, over 60% per cycle. At IB, the overall pregnancy rate after three cycles of treatment is over 90%. […]

Cystic Fibrosis and fertility

Cystic fibrosis is a chronic and progressive disease that appears in early childhood and affects many organs in the body, (such as the lungs, intestines, pancreas, liver…). The disease causes thick mucus production, which leads to blockages and infections.