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What is the significance of FSH hormone levels in fertility?

Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is essential to reproduction. It is produced by the pituitary gland situated just below the brain (behind the palate) and is released into the bloodstream. The hormone regulates the ovaries and is involved in the processes dealing with the growth and selection of the follicle which will later release the egg during ovulation.
Fluctuations in FSH levels are responsible for menstrual cycles and also for the fact that only one egg is produced during each cycle. It is essential, therefore, that there is constant dialogue between the ovaries and the pituitary gland so that the latter can consistently produce the correct quantity of FSH for a normal cycle.
This permanent exchange means that, in cases of poor ovarian function, the pituitary gland will try to compensate for this situation by increasing FSH excretion levels. It is for this reason that FSH levels in women going through the menopause are 20 times greater than in women whose ovaries are functioning normally. Therefore, when the ovary does not respond correctly, FSH increases significantly and systematically. […]

Reduced mobility and fertility

Reproduction issues always need to be dealt with with a degree of sensitivity. When there is also a disability within the couple, the emotional side of things calls for even greater care and steps should be taken in order to deal adequately with any implications the disability in question has from a medical point of view.
In 2006, the United Nations (UN) published guidelines on the rights of people with reduced mobility. These guidelines indicate disabled people’s rights across all levels of society and include the right to have children and access to sexual health.
At Instituto Bernabeu, we aim to comply with the aforementioned guidelines and provide our patients with the means and solutions they need and which adapt to the circumstances of each physical disability. This covers disabilities resulting from a genetic condition (hereditary), disease or an accident and, from a fertility point of view, each case is given personalised treatment. […]

Fertyplan: Carry out a study on your fertility levels so that you can plan motherhood

One of the most important parts of any life plan is to have a family. However, nowadays, an increasing number of women end up not having children when they would ideally have liked to, even when they do not have any disorders that mean they are infertile.
The main reason for this is that, whilst couples do want to have children, they tend to put it off until they are of an age when the likelihood of falling pregnant is significantly lower. […]

Beta hCG (β-hCG) result table

ACCESS INFORMATION PRIOR TO THIS POST ON BETA
β-hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) is a glycoprotein that is initially secreted by trophoblast cells in the embryo shortly after it implants in the uterus. The rapid increase in serum levels of hCG following conception means it is an excellent early indicator of pregnancy. It’s also a parameter which is widely used for monitoring that a pregnancy is progressing correctly.
On a physiological level, hCG triggers the corpus luteum and thus facilitates progesterone and oestrogen synthesis. Progesterone stimulates the maturing of blood and capillary vessels that help the foetus to develop correctly.
hCG levels can be measured in blood or in urine.
Urine tests have a detection limit of 20 to 100 mUI/ml depending on the brand. If the measurement is to be taken in urine, a sample of the first urine of the day is recommended. This is particularly true during the early days of pregnancy because, if the urine is too diluted, the test can return incorrect negative results.
hCG levels in blood can be used to detect levels as low as 5 mUI/ml and the concentration levels of the hormone can therefore be calculated.
hCG levels in multiple pregnancies are 30-50 % higher than in pregnancies where there is only one foetus. However, a multiple pregnancy should be confirmed by means of an ultrasound.
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Vasectomies: the male contraceptive

Vasectomies are the most reliable method of male contraception and an estimated 40 to 60 million men worldwide have chosen to have one.  They are the most widely used contraceptive method for men looking to achieve permanent sterility for family planning or personal reasons.
The procedure should be thought of as irreversible. It has a low complications rate and failure is very infrequent. A vasectomy does not begin to work immediately and couples need to continue to use contraceptives until absolute sterility has been achieved. Vasectomies are safe and do not have any side effects or cause serious illness in the long term. It is a method that is used for avoiding pregnancy in long standing relationships but also as a personal sterility method in men who are not in a relationship (those who have separated, divorcees or widowers) but who do have sexual intercourse or, even when they are in a relationship, do not wish to have more children. […]

By |10 de June de 2016|Fertility, Genetics, News, Pregnancy, Sterility, Urology|0 Comments

Diagnostic hysteroscopy and endometrial scratching

We consider an evaluation of the uterine cavity and a check to ensure normal structure in the tissue that lines it (the endometrium) to be a standard part of any implantation failure study. In order to carry out such a study, the most appropriate diagnosis consists of a diagnostic hysteroscopy and an endometrial biopsy.
A hysteroscopy is an endoscopy of the uterus. In other words, direct inspection of the uterine cavity using an optical system. It’s a simple test and practically pain free in most cases. Therefore, it is generally carried out during an appointment with minimal patient preparation and no impact on her daily life. […]

Ovarian stimulation: What is it? Are there any risks involved?

During the first few days of a period, a complex process takes place in the ovaries. The first step is to gather and initiate development in several follicles that contain eggs. Following this, only one egg is selected and it then develops. A mature egg is released during ovulation.
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The 600 recessive disorders detected by the Genetic Compatibility Test (GCT)

Nowadays, all couples who wish to avoid passing on genetic disorders to their children can choose to do so through a Genetic Compatibility Test (GCT), also known as Prenatal Recessive Disorder Screening.
The Instituto Bernabeu GCT is a groundbreaking analysis that uses next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) through which we study 555 genetic mutations which cause over 600 autosomal recessive disorders in a simple blood sample.

Please see below the list of mutations analysed by the GCT we do at INSTITUTO BERNABEU:
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The immune system and pregnancy

Numerous factors are involved in making the amazing miracle of pregnancy possible. Many of them are very well understood whilst others, such as the immune system and its role in embryo implantation, given their importance, are still being studied and researched in depth. If the immune system is what protects the body against infection and diseases thanks to its defences, what role does it play in achieving pregnancy? […]

Embryo transfer on day 3 or day 5. The pros and cons.

Determining the ideal day for embryo transfer has always been a controversial issue and there are, even today, still a number of doubts surrounding this issue.
Embryo culture is, basically, a selection process. Each embryo’s progress is evaluated throughout and a decision is taken on which is most likely to implant successfully. […]