A negative beta hCG test. Now what?

What happens following the wait (‘the beta hCG wait’) which generates so much anxiety whilst, at the same time, creating the hope that our lives may be changed forever when, in the end, the result is negative?
Many patients say that the absence of symptoms meant that they knew what was coming; others were also expecting the worst because they had begun to bleed prior to getting the result of the analysis.
It’s important to point out that the presence or absence of ‘symptoms’ which women associate with pregnancy are not a means of diagnosis. It’s also important to clarify that vaginal bleeding of varying intensity is not infrequent prior to the programmed pregnancy test date and this does not necessarily mean that the result will be negative. Indeed, the results obtained from an analysis of the pregnancy hormone in blood is the only reliable proof available. A urine analysis is also an option but needs to be carried out a little later on and is not one hundred percent reliable. […]

What is a hydrosalpinx and how will it affect my fertility?

The tubes connecting the ovaries and the uterus are known as the Fallopian tubes (or uterine tubes). These structures play an essential role in natural reproduction and are responsible for receiving the egg each month and, furthermore, it is here that the union between egg and sperm takes place (fertilisation). They also enable the resulting embryo to be transported to the uterus which is where pregnancy will take place.
A hydrosalpinx is the result of an obstruction at the far ends of the Fallopian tubes which leads to the area becoming filled with liquid. This can lead to the Fallopian tubes becoming very swollen and distended, resulting in a ‘sausage-like’ appearance. In many cases, the obstruction and the liquid that has accumulated impair correct functioning of the Fallopian tube: semen does not travel up, the egg is not received by the tube and fertilisation does not take place, making achieving a natural pregnancy complicated (particularly so if both Fallopian tubes are affected). Alternatively, a hydrosalpinx can lead to pregnancy occurring within the tubes themselves (ectopic pregnancy). […]

Teratozoospermia and male infertility

Teratozoospermia is an increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm in a sperm sample and it is identified by means of a seminogram or semen analysis.
According to the criteria in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO), 2010 manual, a man has teratozoospermia when the percentage of normal spermatozoa in the ejaculate is below 4%.
Defects in sperm […]

Progesterone and its role in reproduction

What is progesterone? Just a simple look at the word itself gives us an idea of what its functions are. PROGESTERONE: the hormone which facilitates pregnancy. This is a good point from which to start out.
Progesterone plays an essential role in pregnancy and it has many and varied effects. It is a natural substance which is secreted from the ovaries following ovulation and continues throughout the second half of the menstrual cycle. Progesterone ensures that a woman’s uterus is receptive and, when production is insufficient, the embryo does not implant correctly or runs a high risk of leading to a miscarriage. It also relaxes the muscles in the uterus, making it better suited for the early days of pregnancy. […]

Implantation failure and repeated miscarriage. Treatment options

Successfully treating implantation failure and recurrent pregnancy loss is undoubtedly a challenge for doctors and for patients.

It is an area on which we continuously focus research at Instituto Bernabeu and, whilst we are far from finding a solution to all problems, the number of couples we are able to successfully treat is forever increasing.

An approach which does not take all 3 parties into account – the female, the male and the embryo – is incomplete. When evaluation only takes the couple into account, the reason behind the issue is only determined in under 20% of all cases. […]

14th November, World Diabetes Day. Your Gynecological Care

On the occasion of the World Diabetes Day, we have dedicated today’s post. At Instituto Bernabeu, our different departments are prepared for the care of patients with this condition. The diabetic patient needs special care, so you should know all the information about your gynaecological and reproductive health, as well as the most appropriate method […]

FSH hormone levels

Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is produced by the pituitary gland situated at the base of the brain. It is released from this gland into the bloodstream and plays an essential role with regards to the ovaries. Its purpose is to stimulate follicle growth and selection and it also plays a role in maturing the egg which will later be released during ovulation.
In cases of ovarian insufficiency, the pituitary gland attempts to compensate for this by increasing FSH secretion. This happens in a physiological manner during the menopause and, as a result, women going through this stage have FSH levels which are far above those in women of childbearing age.

If abnormally high levels of FSH (>10 lU/L) are detected at a young age, this can be a suggestion of low ovarian reserve which reduces the possibility of getting pregnant naturally. […]

Oligozoospermia: What is it? How can it be detected? What course of treatment can be used in order to get pregnant? What about criptozoospermia?

Oligozoospermia is the presence of an abnormally low number of sperm in a semen sample.
According to the criteria in the 5th edition of the World Health Organisation (WHO) manual, normal sperm content in a sample of semen should be equal to or above 15 million per millimetre. If a sperm count gives a result below this figure, this is known as oligozoospermia and it may be associated with fertility issues. More than one sample will need to be evaluated in order to confirm this.
The diagnosis method consists of a spermogram which, amongst other things, gives a sperm count per millimetre of semen. […]

Helping a relative or friend with fertility issues.

Infertility can have an impact on many levels: it can affect the person with the issue as well as that person’s partner. When a couple embarks upon such a significant project as maternity and is faced with failure month after month, despite every effort, negative feelings such as anger, resistance, frustration, despair and sadness arise and they are difficult to manage. This can lead to feelings of depression and anxiety. On the whole, it is an issue which patients find difficult to speak about and, as a result, they are not surrounded by a strong social or family support network.

If you know anyone who may be suffering from the emotional impact of infertility, here are 10 pieces of useful advice: […]

Male fertility tests

When a couple is faced with difficulties getting pregnant, there is approximately a 50% chance of the reason for this being a factor in the male partner.
The main cause of fertility issues in men is poor semen quality. Therefore, various parameters in semen need to be analysed in order to determine what the quality of the semen is. Two parameters are particularly important: the concentration or quantity of sperm in semen and their motility. This needs to be adequate in order to ensure that the egg is fertilised.
There are several quick tests available on the market. They are similar to female ovulation tests and they are understood to carefully evaluate semen quality and determine if a man is fertile or not. But are these tests really useful in understanding semen quality? […]

By |2016-10-20T18:04:30+00:0021 de October de 2016|Fertility, News, Pregnancy, Sterility, Urology|0 Comments